Microbial toxins-related methods to fight cancer: DPSRU

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  Misbah Ali

The naturally derived microbial toxins are showing signs of successful new dimension as a therapy against cancer cells, the researchers at Delhi Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research University (DPSRU) reported.

Dr. Prabodh Chander Sharma, Associate Professor at DPSRU, New Delhi said, “The naturally derived microbial toxins as a therapy against cancer cells are a promising new dimension. These microbial toxins have diverse mechanisms of action.”

The scientific development noted these act on different bio-targets such as inhibition of protein synthesis, reduction in cell growth, regulation of cell cycle, and many cellular processes.

“Bacterial toxins produce actions primarily by targeting protein moieties and some immune-modulation and few acts through DNA. Fungal toxins appear to have more DNA damaging activity and affect the cell cycle. Algal toxins produce alteration in mitochondrial phosphorylation,” DPSRU said in a press release.

Prof. Ramesh K Goyal, Vice-Chancellor of DPSRU emphasised, “Microbial toxins and their metabolites appear to have a great potential to provide a promising option for the treatment and management to combat cancer.”

According to Prof. Ramesh, the primary challenge concerning effective cancer treatment is to securely deliver the microbial toxin to target cancer cells.

The application of toxins to combat cancer cells has evolved constantly with minimised side effects.

The report has been recently published in a highly prestigious international journal—Seminars in Cancer Biology that is dedicated to recent developments in the field of molecular oncology covering diverse aspects from the underlying genetic and molecular causes of cellular transformation and cancer to the molecular basis of potential therapies.

Dr. Jitender Kumar Bhardwaj and Dr. Archana Sharma, authors of the paper from Kurukshetra University, informed that these agents act on different bio-targets such as inhibition of protein synthesis, reduction in cell growth, regulation of cell cycle, and many cellular processes.

Prof. Vijay K. Thakur from SURC, University of Edinburgh, UK said, “This therapy is getting popularised as a very promising therapy.”

The paper has contributors from several institutes in India such as the University of Jammu, RCPIPER, Maharashtra, and the UK.

 


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